A parents’ guide to being Share Aware -

Helping you to keep your child safe online

We know some parents feel overwhelmed by the internet. It’s constantly changing, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest apps and trends. It can be particularly tricky for parents of children aged 8-12. That’s the age when children start doing more online, becoming more independent and using different devices. So, the NSPCC has put together this guide to reassure you, and give you the information and advice you’ll need to keep your child safe online. The internet’s an amazing place, so we want to help your child to get the most out of it, and to do that safely. The guidance is actually really simple - it’s all about talking to your child, getting the family involved, and finding out what you can do.

Click here to download A Parent's Guide to Being Share Aware by the NSPCC

PREVENT RADICALISATION 

Guidance from Lincolnshire County Council:

It can be hard to know what to do if you’re worried someone close is expressing extreme views or hatred, which could lead to them harming themselves or others. Working with other organisations, the police protect vulnerable people from being exploited by extremists through a Home Office programme called Prevent.

Young people can be at a greater risk of being targeted by extremists and the internet has made it much easier for radicalisers to find and identify people who might be easily influenced.

In Lincolnshire, last year most of the cases referred to Prevent related to young people and one of the biggest concerns was online activity including the sharing of extremist information.

Friends and family are often the first to spot worrying changes taking place. These can be big or small changes that take place very quickly or over a longer period. Trust your instincts and if you’re concerned seek advice.

ACT Early provides advice on the risks of radicalisation, spotting the signs and what to do if concerned. 

ACT Early | Prevent radicalisation

https://actearly.uk

Parent Guides to what their child's use of the internet:

WHATSAPP: A Parent's Guide

SNAPCHAT: A Parent's Guide

TikTok: Parent Factsheet

FORTNITE: What Parents Need to Know

INSTAGRAM: A Parent's Guide

Further guides and support about APPS, Online Gaming and risks to children

https://nationalonlinesafety.com/ 

 

Videos that you can watch with your children that we use in school. 

Please see some videos below that can support you in keeping your child safe.  There are also some to help the children keep safe - please watch these first.  We share the Pantosaurus video with all pupils in KS1 and up at various times as part of our PSHE programme.  We share the 'I've seen your willy!' video with children in KS2 when appropriate.

Supporting Pre-Schoolers online

Supporting 6 to 10 year olds online

Supporting pre-teens online

The dangers of sharing images of yourself online

image

Key Points from the NSPCC talk to parents:

Make sure you are the person that your child can talk to openly about their online activity.  

Take an interest in what they are doing online - gaming, socialising etc.

Make sure what they are doing is age appropriate.  Is it a good idea to tell them it's OK to lie about their age online?  Is it OK to lie online?

Speak pants and teach them the underwear rule.

As many women abuse children as men.

Peer abuse is increasing - children that you don't know are strangers too!

The 'billboard test': think - before you put something online would you put it on a billboard for everyone to see?

Don't share pictures of your children in their school uniform-names and uniform give the world an idea of where you live and who you are.

Every O2 store has a guru who is trained to help keep your profiles and devices safe by helping you with the settings.  You don't have to be on O2 to access this service.

Children are more at risk if they access the internet from their bedrooms.  Put the computer/games console in a shared place in your home.

A parents’ guide to being Share Aware -

Helping you to keep your child safe online

We know some parents feel overwhelmed by the internet. It’s constantly changing, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest apps and trends. It can be particularly tricky for parents of children aged 8-12. That’s the age when children start doing more online, becoming more independent and using different devices. So, the NSPCC has put together this guide to reassure you, and give you the information and advice you’ll need to keep your child safe online. The internet’s an amazing place, so we want to help your child to get the most out of it, and to do that safely. The guidance is actually really simple - it’s all about talking to your child, getting the family involved, and finding out what you can do.

Click here to download A Parent's Guide to Being Share Aware by the NSPCC

PREVENT RADICALISATION 

Guidance from Lincolnshire County Council:

It can be hard to know what to do if you’re worried someone close is expressing extreme views or hatred, which could lead to them harming themselves or others. Working with other organisations, the police protect vulnerable people from being exploited by extremists through a Home Office programme called Prevent.

Young people can be at a greater risk of being targeted by extremists and the internet has made it much easier for radicalisers to find and identify people who might be easily influenced.

In Lincolnshire, last year most of the cases referred to Prevent related to young people and one of the biggest concerns was online activity including the sharing of extremist information.

Friends and family are often the first to spot worrying changes taking place. These can be big or small changes that take place very quickly or over a longer period. Trust your instincts and if you’re concerned seek advice.

ACT Early provides advice on the risks of radicalisation, spotting the signs and what to do if concerned. 

ACT Early | Prevent radicalisation

https://actearly.uk

Parent Guides to what their child's use of the internet:

WHATSAPP: A Parent's Guide

SNAPCHAT: A Parent's Guide

TikTok: Parent Factsheet

FORTNITE: What Parents Need to Know

INSTAGRAM: A Parent's Guide

Further guides and support about APPS, Online Gaming and risks to children

https://nationalonlinesafety.com/ 

 

Videos that you can watch with your children that we use in school. 

Please see some videos below that can support you in keeping your child safe.  There are also some to help the children keep safe - please watch these first.  We share the Pantosaurus video with all pupils in KS1 and up at various times as part of our PSHE programme.  We share the 'I've seen your willy!' video with children in KS2 when appropriate.

Supporting Pre-Schoolers online

Supporting 6 to 10 year olds online

Supporting pre-teens online

The dangers of sharing images of yourself online

image

Key Points from the NSPCC talk to parents:

Make sure you are the person that your child can talk to openly about their online activity.  

Take an interest in what they are doing online - gaming, socialising etc.

Make sure what they are doing is age appropriate.  Is it a good idea to tell them it's OK to lie about their age online?  Is it OK to lie online?

Speak pants and teach them the underwear rule.

As many women abuse children as men.

Peer abuse is increasing - children that you don't know are strangers too!

The 'billboard test': think - before you put something online would you put it on a billboard for everyone to see?

Don't share pictures of your children in their school uniform-names and uniform give the world an idea of where you live and who you are.

Every O2 store has a guru who is trained to help keep your profiles and devices safe by helping you with the settings.  You don't have to be on O2 to access this service.

Children are more at risk if they access the internet from their bedrooms.  Put the computer/games console in a shared place in your home.

A parents’ guide to being Share Aware -

Helping you to keep your child safe online

We know some parents feel overwhelmed by the internet. It’s constantly changing, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest apps and trends. It can be particularly tricky for parents of children aged 8-12. That’s the age when children start doing more online, becoming more independent and using different devices. So, the NSPCC has put together this guide to reassure you, and give you the information and advice you’ll need to keep your child safe online. The internet’s an amazing place, so we want to help your child to get the most out of it, and to do that safely. The guidance is actually really simple - it’s all about talking to your child, getting the family involved, and finding out what you can do.

Click here to download A Parent's Guide to Being Share Aware by the NSPCC

PREVENT RADICALISATION 

Guidance from Lincolnshire County Council:

It can be hard to know what to do if you’re worried someone close is expressing extreme views or hatred, which could lead to them harming themselves or others. Working with other organisations, the police protect vulnerable people from being exploited by extremists through a Home Office programme called Prevent.

Young people can be at a greater risk of being targeted by extremists and the internet has made it much easier for radicalisers to find and identify people who might be easily influenced.

In Lincolnshire, last year most of the cases referred to Prevent related to young people and one of the biggest concerns was online activity including the sharing of extremist information.

Friends and family are often the first to spot worrying changes taking place. These can be big or small changes that take place very quickly or over a longer period. Trust your instincts and if you’re concerned seek advice.

ACT Early provides advice on the risks of radicalisation, spotting the signs and what to do if concerned. 

ACT Early | Prevent radicalisation

https://actearly.uk

Parent Guides to what their child's use of the internet:

WHATSAPP: A Parent's Guide

SNAPCHAT: A Parent's Guide

TikTok: Parent Factsheet

FORTNITE: What Parents Need to Know

INSTAGRAM: A Parent's Guide

Further guides and support about APPS, Online Gaming and risks to children

https://nationalonlinesafety.com/ 

 

Videos that you can watch with your children that we use in school. 

Please see some videos below that can support you in keeping your child safe.  There are also some to help the children keep safe - please watch these first.  We share the Pantosaurus video with all pupils in KS1 and up at various times as part of our PSHE programme.  We share the 'I've seen your willy!' video with children in KS2 when appropriate.

Supporting Pre-Schoolers online

Supporting 6 to 10 year olds online

Supporting pre-teens online

The dangers of sharing images of yourself online

image

Key Points from the NSPCC talk to parents:

Make sure you are the person that your child can talk to openly about their online activity.  

Take an interest in what they are doing online - gaming, socialising etc.

Make sure what they are doing is age appropriate.  Is it a good idea to tell them it's OK to lie about their age online?  Is it OK to lie online?

Speak pants and teach them the underwear rule.

As many women abuse children as men.

Peer abuse is increasing - children that you don't know are strangers too!

The 'billboard test': think - before you put something online would you put it on a billboard for everyone to see?

Don't share pictures of your children in their school uniform-names and uniform give the world an idea of where you live and who you are.

Every O2 store has a guru who is trained to help keep your profiles and devices safe by helping you with the settings.  You don't have to be on O2 to access this service.

Children are more at risk if they access the internet from their bedrooms.  Put the computer/games console in a shared place in your home.

A parents’ guide to being Share Aware -

Helping you to keep your child safe online

We know some parents feel overwhelmed by the internet. It’s constantly changing, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest apps and trends. It can be particularly tricky for parents of children aged 8-12. That’s the age when children start doing more online, becoming more independent and using different devices. So, the NSPCC has put together this guide to reassure you, and give you the information and advice you’ll need to keep your child safe online. The internet’s an amazing place, so we want to help your child to get the most out of it, and to do that safely. The guidance is actually really simple - it’s all about talking to your child, getting the family involved, and finding out what you can do.

Click here to download A Parent's Guide to Being Share Aware by the NSPCC

PREVENT RADICALISATION 

Guidance from Lincolnshire County Council:

It can be hard to know what to do if you’re worried someone close is expressing extreme views or hatred, which could lead to them harming themselves or others. Working with other organisations, the police protect vulnerable people from being exploited by extremists through a Home Office programme called Prevent.

Young people can be at a greater risk of being targeted by extremists and the internet has made it much easier for radicalisers to find and identify people who might be easily influenced.

In Lincolnshire, last year most of the cases referred to Prevent related to young people and one of the biggest concerns was online activity including the sharing of extremist information.

Friends and family are often the first to spot worrying changes taking place. These can be big or small changes that take place very quickly or over a longer period. Trust your instincts and if you’re concerned seek advice.

ACT Early provides advice on the risks of radicalisation, spotting the signs and what to do if concerned. 

ACT Early | Prevent radicalisation

https://actearly.uk

Parent Guides to what their child's use of the internet:

WHATSAPP: A Parent's Guide

SNAPCHAT: A Parent's Guide

TikTok: Parent Factsheet

FORTNITE: What Parents Need to Know

INSTAGRAM: A Parent's Guide

Further guides and support about APPS, Online Gaming and risks to children

https://nationalonlinesafety.com/ 

 

Videos that you can watch with your children that we use in school. 

Please see some videos below that can support you in keeping your child safe.  There are also some to help the children keep safe - please watch these first.  We share the Pantosaurus video with all pupils in KS1 and up at various times as part of our PSHE programme.  We share the 'I've seen your willy!' video with children in KS2 when appropriate.

Supporting Pre-Schoolers online

Supporting 6 to 10 year olds online

Supporting pre-teens online

The dangers of sharing images of yourself online

image

Key Points from the NSPCC talk to parents:

Make sure you are the person that your child can talk to openly about their online activity.  

Take an interest in what they are doing online - gaming, socialising etc.

Make sure what they are doing is age appropriate.  Is it a good idea to tell them it's OK to lie about their age online?  Is it OK to lie online?

Speak pants and teach them the underwear rule.

As many women abuse children as men.

Peer abuse is increasing - children that you don't know are strangers too!

The 'billboard test': think - before you put something online would you put it on a billboard for everyone to see?

Don't share pictures of your children in their school uniform-names and uniform give the world an idea of where you live and who you are.

Every O2 store has a guru who is trained to help keep your profiles and devices safe by helping you with the settings.  You don't have to be on O2 to access this service.

Children are more at risk if they access the internet from their bedrooms.  Put the computer/games console in a shared place in your home.